Coworking & collision of ideas in Barcelona’s craft studios




A jeweler, an electrician, an illustrator… in a corner of Barcelona’s Gothic Quarter, these makers share office space. It may help save on rent or provide networking for solo workers, but one of the side effects of coworking is the inevitable collision of ideas.

On a misty night in Barcelona, we visited a block of the Gothic Quarter with a history of crafters workshops where this generation of coworkers was hosting an evening of open studios.

Our guide, the illustrator and author Stephane Carteron, is camped out in the coworking space run by graphic artist Oscar Noguera. Tonight he’s displaying his travelogue/sketchbook “Tombs pel barri gotic” (inspired by classic “carnet de voyage”), in which describes this micro-neighborhood as an “alternative artistic circuit”.

He introduces us to Angel Muñoz, a resident co-worker, who pays his rent creating websites, but spends his free time tinkering with electronics to create art inspired by fractals and fluid dynamics.

Across the street neighborhood veteran Roberto Cascajosa has created jewelry for the past 10 years. He explains that he and his fellow jeweler coworkers pay the rent by working for major jewelry companies, but it’s their personal “cult” lines that fuel their creativity. He shows us a bracelet from his current collection “Words” that reads “words are the skeleton of things, therefore they last longer”.

Further down the street, Irene Sabaté and Clara Aspachs have spent the past 7 years designing local clothing from the back of their storefront. They source the materials (down to the threads) and produce the clothing for their brand “Name” all in Barcelona, or nearby, and they feel inspired by the creativity on their street. “”From the painter to the graphic artist to the architect to the jewelers, really on this street there’s no repetition and this is what is beautiful.”

Stephane Carteron:
Roberto Carrascosa
Angel Muñoz:
Name:

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12 Comments

  1. Xidcat
    May 14, 2013
    Reply

    interesting : )

  2. Abdelrahman Ayman
    May 14, 2013
    Reply

    I like this idea of bringing professions together. if you work in a company you are given a small specialized role but here you can think more creatively

  3. Bike Man Dan
    May 14, 2013
    Reply

    From watching all of your videos, Barcelona seems like a really interesting city!

  4. Hippabellita
    May 14, 2013
    Reply

    Because he is French? ;-)))))))

  5. Rachel Ward
    May 14, 2013
    Reply

    Only a fellow American would ask that. Sometimes I wonder about my country… LOL

  6. Hippabellita
    May 14, 2013
    Reply

    Interesting and vivid – I would be very interested to know from a "local" from there @ Kirsten ;-))) – what you feel contributes to this vividness and openess compared to other places in the world. What helps artists, craftsmen and entrepreneurs (like the 33 vegan restaurants *gosh*) to establish themselves?

  7. booooomSPLAT
    May 14, 2013
    Reply

    This is amazing!

  8. hempev
    May 14, 2013
    Reply

    He is purposely talking down to us, and the best way is in French.

  9. CALife
    May 14, 2013
    Reply

    This was pointless.

  10. Barterninja
    May 14, 2013
    Reply

    I love this! Even though I am becoming a graphic designer, I don't want to be restrained to a small role. I want to explore things and also work things other then logos and such. However, sharing the workspace with a number of different professions is genius! If one artist is stuck, he or she can go around and see what another type of artist is doing. I do it all the time in the art department and it always helps declogs the idea flow almost every time.

  11. Lotus
    May 15, 2013
    Reply

    Wow, true freedom in creativity…beautiful, just beautiful.

  12. Donnerfuß
    May 24, 2013
    Reply

    At 1 min mark I have a moped just like that one
    Mine is purple

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