How cohousing can make us happier (and live longer) | Grace Kim




Loneliness doesn’t always stem from being alone. For architect Grace Kim, loneliness is a function of how socially connected we feel to the people around us — and it’s often the result of the homes we live in. She shares an age-old antidote to isolation: cohousing, a way of living where people choose to share space with their neighbors, get to know them, and look after them. Rethink your home and how you live in it with this eye-opening talk.

Check out more TED talks:

The TED Talks channel features the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world’s leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design — plus science, business, global issues, the arts and more.

Follow TED on Twitter:
Like TED on Facebook:

Subscribe to our channel:

Previous How To Start An Online Business Tutorial
Next 10 Most Weird Cafe With Unique Service in Japan | You will not hold it

28 Comments

  1. Silver Moon
    February 10, 2018
    Reply

    Idealised concepts like this tend to not work out so well in practise. See council flats.

  2. Geno
    February 11, 2018
    Reply

    It's definitely not for everyone, I grew up in a country where most people live in cohousing, while there are certainly many pros to it, there are many cons too. I now live in a single family house and I enjoy it much better than living in a flat. I'm not someone who tends to feel lonely though, I think I actually prefer being alone most of the time. i don't have an urge of checking my Facebook, unless I get bored then I might, but not because I feel lonely though.

  3. PrivateEyeYiYi
    February 12, 2018
    Reply

    I like the privacy my backyard provides. The last thing I need is to see "Spencer waving at me furiously" from the house next door.

  4. Mack Kiesel
    February 13, 2018
    Reply

    Sounds like living in a college dorm but with your own bedroom and kitchen. I loved living in the dorms. Not a joke ERAU’s Doolittle hall is awesome.

  5. Ian H
    February 14, 2018
    Reply

    If you come from a culture of suburban sprawl, it’s sounds like a utopia, if you come from a culture where cohousing is the the only option, there’s a different feeling about it. Novelty works wonders.

  6. William Hill
    February 14, 2018
    Reply

    My neighbors blast country music all day, play their sports games and NASCAR events loudly, hoot and holler and walk around shirtless yell talking loudly. Why on gods green earth would I want to foster “comunitas”with those people?

  7. Micheal Hunt
    February 14, 2018
    Reply

    Having lived in a lot of different situations over the years, I can say that, for me, this was awesome. As a young man with a very low income, I lived in a quadraplex style apartment in San Antonio for about a year. This was a very poor neighborhood. It wasn't intentionally designed as "co-housing", but our four poor families living in this building would pool resources to make meals together at least 2 or 3 times a week. It was a great experience and I cherish it still.

  8. Brianna Belle
    February 15, 2018
    Reply

    I hope this becomes more popular is love to take part in something like this someday

  9. UpAndUps
    February 16, 2018
    Reply

    I fucking hate all these things start off exactly the same.

  10. Saebrak
    February 16, 2018
    Reply

    This is my nightmare. I hate having neighbors. Much less being forced to share spaces with them.

  11. Sally Lee
    February 17, 2018
    Reply

    Do you have to be interviewed by other inhabitants before renting or buying a unit?

  12. Mr Cloudies Best Friend
    February 17, 2018
    Reply

    A lot of apartment complexes in my city have started doing this. They are very community focused, though it's several large buildings with a central common building in the middle.

    It's a great idea, we've really lost a sense of community.

  13. Chase Wulff
    February 18, 2018
    Reply

    Yes, but is the rent cheaper?

  14. Nicholas lofa
    February 18, 2018
    Reply

    This is definitely a great idea, but only for certain people. I plan on becoming an architect and ideas like this always seem so cool for me, but it’s definitely not what I personally want. When I’m older and have a family, I don’t plan on living in an apartment…I like privacy, and so do a lot of other people. But a lot of other people also like this idea of communal living. In my opinion, the future of cities is a mix of these…if you look at planned communities now, especially those in the Middle East, you’ll see that they tend to have a mix of mid-density and low-density housing/businesses right near each other. This provides people with the choice of where they want to live and an overall happier population.

  15. Mrrockitman
    February 19, 2018
    Reply

    This is like my worst nightmare

  16. drania76
    February 19, 2018
    Reply

    2.30 Sir Charles Branson 11 o'clock.

  17. Ebon Hawk
    February 19, 2018
    Reply

    Everyone who has kids should consider this.
    if you're young and childless, don't bother.

  18. marie Onc
    February 19, 2018
    Reply

    I like social interaction outside my home. I want privacy inside my home. Wouldn't mix

  19. Sierra Southwell
    February 19, 2018
    Reply

    Dear God this sounds terrible. As someone who has to deal with customers as a job (being falsely friendly and happy.) The LAST thing I want to do is have to do this at home.

  20. HollywoodF1
    February 20, 2018
    Reply

    My workplace is like where she lives, including the meals.  I enjoy and look forward to it.  It's such a big part of my day that I likewise look forward to my quiet time at home.  The two balance each other.

  21. Amilkar Nava
    February 20, 2018
    Reply

    Fake news

  22. The Char Lie Lhama
    February 20, 2018
    Reply

    Call you in 20 years?
    With what phone? 😉
    I do live in a high rise, and do tend to get along nicely with my neighbors though. The social interactions could be improved upon, but most of it is down to me, and my health.

  23. Albert Sachteleben
    February 21, 2018
    Reply

    Wow, shocked by all the negativity in the comments.

  24. bett d' Wolf
    February 21, 2018
    Reply

    In southern france its still totally normal for generations of families to live together. In belgium people don't run away from each other. I was really sad to see when I went to England how people grew up and couldn't wait to abandon their parents, they leave at eighteen and see their parents once a month. Families exist for a reason, love your familie. You don't need to move out into so fancy social project. If you have no family (like my step dad) you move into a new family and you all live together and share the cost and the childcare and the created drama and happiness. PLus when your parents are elderly you are there to look after them, they aren't left to some stranger and its easier because you actually have a relationship with them. If you don't want to be lonely work on the relationships you have don't go out and struggle to make endless new ones

  25. Martin Schmid
    February 22, 2018
    Reply

    Great video!
    About people staring at their phones: most people use them for messengers and social media. So technology doesn't make us less social, it just changes the way we are social. If used right, it can be great. Of course if you only use it for superficial relationships, it can still make you feel disconnected.

  26. Riccardo Yu
    February 22, 2018
    Reply

    四合院是不是一种cohousing.

  27. CatherineZ
    February 24, 2018
    Reply

    This looks like communist community housing, but fancier (which is the nice part). If you read diaries and letters of those who lived in similar arrangements at the dawn of Soviet Union, you'll find that while it worked for those who enthusiastically built such communities, later those who were not much into them made them into a miserable living. It may only work if people who are not into the idea would immediately sell their apartment and those who want exactly this move in.

    I imagine inheriting such an apartment or even seeing it being sold and buying it. Make it appealing for me because of other reasons like proximity to my work, and parks etc., I wouldn't move out, and I would probably spoil it for everybody. I don't want most of communal activities because I don't like when people tell me what to do (and I'm not even talking about the habit many people have to give advice no one asked for, and be offended that their opinion is not treated as a golden standard of how to live). I may not want to or maybe can't pay for all that communal stuff others want. And if some tenants don't treat communal property carefully as if it was their own (which it partially is), make an effort to keep it clean and functioning, all this paradise will go down the hill very quickly.

    The idea is not bad, is really good in its own way. But it's too complicated, it requires too much of the tenants to work well, it is not suitable for most people.

  28. Eugene Yeow
    February 25, 2018
    Reply

    It's an ancient mode of living. But with increasing wealth ever since the industrial revolution, the aspiration has been to have one's own property. Living communally is seen as either old fashion or for poor people, maybe both. It's going to be hard to overcome this entrenched bias. Also, it used to work well because it would have been the same family or tribe living together, there are inbuilt bonds that make living together easier. This "new" model that she is proposing has a well meaning component of intention but unfortunately, we all know that when you put a group of strangers together, the tension from bad behaviour can overcome whatever good intentions you had in the beginning.

Leave a reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *