Modern & Mayan craft inspire quake-proof homes, learning coop




When a community group in Guadalajara, Mexico wanted to build housing for workshops on their land overlooking the Huentitán Canyon, they called on Sandy Minier and Javier Reyes, architects specializing in natural construction and traditional Mesoamerican techniques. Teaming up with architect Pedro Bravo, the group designed a mixed modern and traditional structure that was so simple to assemble that 100 untrained volunteers erected it in 4 days.

After a concrete base had been laid, the volunteers crafted walls of bahareque (mud and reed frames) and tierra compactada (rammed earth) and wove lattices from carrizo (a reed from the bamboo family) to protect the exterior from wind, rain and sun.

In the completed community center built for the Mexican Institute for Community Development (IMDEC), there are bunk rooms and private apartments, as well as bathrooms, showers and a multipurpose meeting room with spectacular views of the canyon. The space is used by IMDEC, and is rented out by non-profits to hold conventions and workshops.

(In video, Humberto Castorena, director)

Previous 10 Future A-List Actors Who Made Horror Movies
Next COFFEE IS BAE | VLOGTOBER #11

25 Comments

  1. Allan Edwin
    October 11, 2017
    Reply

    Have been subscribed for a few years now. I am fascinated and buoyed with this theme of re-examining traditional techniques with a current understanding of materials and engineering. I cheered when they said they disagree with the idea implicit in architectural teaching that each era supersedes what came before. I do not think this is "hippy dippy" thinking at all. To think that modern construction techniques developed in cold climates, is the end-all, be-all, of home building is plain arrogant and frankly closed-minded. I enjoyed this video greatly because it dove deep into what they tried and why. They're not claiming earth is better for everything. (There's concrete in the showers because it addresses the issue of moisture better than anything else.) What they're saying is that "concrete, concrete, concrete .. brick, brick, brick" is not nearly as good as reviving techniques that better address earthquakes, hurricanes, baking heat, changing needs, community engagement, skills development, materials recycling, resource access, affordability, sustainability, etc., etc.. If you haven't figured out that this channel is mainly about celebrating people and ideas that are different, then you're just not paying attention.

  2. Jennifer H.
    October 16, 2017
    Reply

    Ok folks this is an alternative to a reg Earthship house some of which do not entice me. Nice to see an alternative place with a modern feel, it's also not pretentious in materials being ultra modern/industrialized / high price

  3. SpiritBear12
    October 16, 2017
    Reply

    It looks comfortable and breathable. I like the natural colors, I think they are relaxing. I like how it's designed to let air move all around, through every room and space.
    I liked the adobe house too.

  4. louisa curiel
    October 16, 2017
    Reply

    That's my México, thank you very much and beautiful woman your español is excellent.

  5. ME-Tube Your Space!
    October 16, 2017
    Reply

    I like the concept in building a home from a garage. Love the floor layout, but the loft looks too dangerous. Nice concept, but only if they have enough walking space around it and maybe build something around it to prevent them from falling. Otherwise, nice video.

  6. DOUG HUNTER
    October 17, 2017
    Reply

    I have enjoyed all of your folk's work but this one especially…thanks…God bless the good…doug

  7. DanvillePoet
    October 17, 2017
    Reply

    Great video as usual, but a more direct, exact translation of the Spanish would make a richer dialogue.

  8. Rose Reyna
    October 18, 2017
    Reply

    Hermoso.. Gracias Por Compartir.

  9. Silverback Gorrilla
    October 18, 2017
    Reply

    Wouldn't it have been easier and smarter to just design the building so it doesn't even touch the tree? I mean, I understand their care for the tree, but the building design has no restrictions on its shape. Maybe design that part of the building further away from the tree?

  10. E Rafael Alva Man
    October 18, 2017
    Reply

    Way to go!!!

  11. Jesse Taylor
    October 20, 2017
    Reply

    Those buildings are So Magnificent. Good for those people! How wonderful?

  12. Moshe Motta
    October 20, 2017
    Reply

    One of my favorite videos you did so far, along the one with Brian Kittel!

  13. GNAR LEE
    October 23, 2017
    Reply

    Wow so an amazing structure.

  14. Adrian Sosa
    October 23, 2017
    Reply

    use TUNG OIL INSTEAD!!! THE OIL YOU ARE USING WILL MOLD BUT TUNG OIL WONT AND LEMON OIL!!!

  15. Adrian Sosa
    October 23, 2017
    Reply

    PURE LEMON OIL FURNITURE TREATMENT BUT WITHOUT BEESWAX, LINSEED OIL OR SILICONES!! THE LEMON WILL PREVENT THE WOOD FROM DRYING IT CLEANS AND PROTECTS IT KEEPS THE FINISH CLEAN AS WELL AS TO PROTECT FINE WOOD! linseed oil darkend with age in damp climates linseed oil is bad about mildewing!!! linseed oil will get gummy and will soften the finish! beeswax turns black after a while you will have a sticky mess because wax wont harden plus it attracts dust!!! use pure lemon oil essence!!! use tung oil hand rubbed it is not toxic it is an excellent sealer for wood, metal, or concrete!! tung oil is all you need!! it replaces all varnish (lacquer or shellac) or polyurethanes!!!

  16. sailmonkey flying
    October 23, 2017
    Reply

    They've only scratched the surface of Mesoamerican building techniques, esp. the use of reeds.

  17. LunaOverEden
    October 26, 2017
    Reply

    Only haters give thumbs down. Jealousy gets you nowhere!

  18. CrankyBubushka
    October 30, 2017
    Reply

    This place is so beautiful. I would love to live there.

  19. CrankyBubushka
    October 31, 2017
    Reply

    I am so happy that there is this group preserving old ways of doing things. I love the natural building techniques being used and the need to teach others how to do it. I also love the garden and growing things using traditions and seeds. Yes, the corn from the U.S. is bad. Please continue to teach the old ways and keep your culture and traditions.

  20. Marcia Sanderson
    October 31, 2017
    Reply

    What a beautiful incredible place

  21. Canyon Haverfield
    November 4, 2017
    Reply

    what a huge effort of devotion .. both theirs and that of FairCompanies . Thank you !

  22. Dub Shack
    November 6, 2017
    Reply

    Holy cow totally integrating the nature

  23. GyrlBlaque
    November 22, 2017
    Reply

    The subtitles are eye straining

  24. Mona Taylor
    December 6, 2017
    Reply

    Excelente

  25. OceanSwimmer
    December 11, 2017
    Reply

    Hi Kirsten, Would you post a link with what you consider the best container home you've seen so far? I'm considering it but have some misgivings about design. Thank you : )

Leave a reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *